Lavandula dentata - French Lavender
Lamiaceae

Lavandula dentata - French Lavender - Lamiaceae

Lavandula dentata, commonly known as French Lavender, is an evergreen shrub native to Eastern and Southern Spain. The gray-tomentose leaves are linear-oblong and crenately toothed. Plants will reach from 1-3 feet (0.3-0.9 m) tall and wide. Although this lavender is not used for culinary uses, it does have a nice clean aroma to it. All Lavenders are very easy plants to grow whether in the landscape or in containers. Most Lavenders are hardy in USDA zone 8-11; in colder climates they should be grown in container and over wintered inside.

Blooming: This lovely Lavender will bloom nonstop from early summer to fall in the landscape and we have had it bloom all year long in the greenhouse.

Culture: Lavandula dentata need full sun to light shade with a well drained soil mix. In the greenhouse, we use a soil mix consisting of 2 parts sand to 1 part loam to 1 part peat moss. The plants are well watered and allowed to dry before watering again. Plants established in the landscape are very drought tolerant. We fertilize the plants monthly with a balanced fertilizer diluted to 1/2 the strength recommended on the label. During the winter months in the greenhouse, we restrict the water to just enough to keep the leaves from shriveling and fertilizer is withheld during this period. Plants are fairly fast growing and should be re-potted every couple of years.

Propagation: Lavandula dentata is propagated by cutting taken from new growth in the spring and from seed.

Lavandula dentata was featured as Plant of the Week March 6-12, 2009.

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Cal's Plant of the Week was provided as a service by the University of Oklahoma Department of Microbiology & Plant Biology and specifically Cal Lemke, who used to be OU's botany greenhouse grower and an avid gardener at home as well. If the above links don't work, then try the overview site. You may also like to look at the thumbnail index. ©1998-2012 All rights reserved.