Buddleia indica - Indoor Oak
Loganiaceae

Buddleia indica Indoor Oak

Buddleia indica or Indoor Oak is a small, compact, evergreen shrub native to Madagascar. The bushy plants will reach up to 18 inches (45 cm) tall with a spreading habit. The 1-2 inch (2.5-5 cm) dark, metallic green leaves have scalloped edges. It is one of the old time house plants that was used extensively from the 1920's to 1940's before the use of central heat and air. It is an easy plant to grow and makes a wonderful companion plant to use in the same conditions as Aspidistra and Sansevieria.

Blooming: The plants are not likely to bloom in containers.

Culture: Buddleia indica need cool temperatures and shady to low light conditions with a moist well drained soil. In the greenhouse, we use a soil mix consisting of 1 part peat moss to 2 parts loam to 1 part sand or perlite. The plants are well watered during the growing season and misted on a daily basis. They are fertilized every other week with a balanced fertilizer diluted to ˝ the strength recommended on the label. The plants should be placed in the coolest position in the greenhouse or home. In summer, they like the average temperature to run between 70-75°F (21-24° C). If the temperatures get higher, they tend to drop their leaves. During the winter months, we move the plants to our cool rooms where the average nighttime temperature averages 48° F (9° C) and we restrict water, but plants should still be misted daily during this period.

Propagation: Buddleia indica are easily propagated from cuttings taken in April and May. Cuttings root very fast in 1-2 weeks.

Buddleia indica was featured as Plant of the Week November 18-24, 2005.

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Cal's Plant of the Week was provided as a service by the University of Oklahoma Department of Microbiology & Plant Biology and specifically Cal Lemke, who used to be OU's botany greenhouse grower and an avid gardener at home as well. If the above links don't work, then try the overview site. You may also like to look at the thumbnail index. ©1998-2012 All rights reserved.